Russia Armenia Military Agreement

Military cooperation between Armenia and Russia is based on the fact that both states are members of the Military Alliance (OVKS) and participate in the CIS Joint Air Defense System. Russia has in Gyumri (formerly Alexandropol), north of Yerevan, one of its military bases abroad (102nd military base) as part of the Russian group of Transcaucasian armed forces; the corresponding contract was extended from 2010 to 2044. [23] Moscow has also pledged to provide Armenia with more weapons and military equipment. [24] On December 8, 2015, the Erebuni base (Part 102) was reinforced with six advanced Mi-24P combat helicopters and a Mi-8MT transport helicopter provided by the Russian Air Base in the Krasnodar Region. [25] [26] According to a presidential decree, Putin ordered the Russian Defense Ministry and the Foreign Ministry to discuss an agreement with Armenia. „We hope to be able to strengthen cooperation with Russia not only in the security sector, but also in the military and technical fields,“ he said, according to his press service. Azerbaijan has insisted that its close ally, Turkey, play a central role in implementing the deal, after Ankara was widely accused of handing over Syrian mercenaries to bolster Baku`s army during the fighting. Since 21 December 2011, the parties have been eligible to veto the establishment of new foreign military bases in the member states of the Collective Security Treaty Organisation (OVKS). In addition, Kazakhstan took over the rotating chairmanship of the Belarusian OVKS. [6] Armenia, Azerbaijan and Russia have signed an agreement to end the military conflict over the controversial Enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh. Armenia and Azerbaijan agreed on November 9 after six weeks of fighting for the self-proclaimed republic to a ceasefire brokered by Russia. As part of the deal, Azerbaijan will regain control of three districts controlled by separatists since the 1990s. The military cooperation project was proposed by the Ministry of Defence with the agreement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and other interested federal authorities.

The obligations of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (OVKS), a military alliance of six former Soviet states, do not apply to the Nagorno-Karabakh region, the Russian president`s spokesman said on Wednesday. „True partnership is one thing and a declaration of intent is another; Agreeing, working seriously, meeting halfway, helping each other is one thing and making decisions on granting permanent residence to people who have lost their jobs is another. More than 250 international treaties and agreements, including the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance of 29 August 1997, have been concluded between the two States at the level of government, ministers and agencies. Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinjan on Saturday called for greater military cooperation with Russia, a day after Azerbaijani troops began advancing into disputed areas previously held by Armenian separatists. President Putin said the deal would involve an exchange of prisoners of war, with „all economic and transport contacts to be released.“ the organisation of the collective security contract (OVKS); Russian: Организация Договора о ккктивной Безопасности, Organizatsiya Dogovora o Kollektivnoy Bezopasnosti, ODKB) is an intergovernmental military alliance signed on May 15, 1992. In 1992, six post-Soviet states belonging to the Commonwealth of Independent States – Russia, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan – signed the Collective Security Treaty (also known as the Tashkent Pact or the Tashkent Treaty). [1] Three other post-Soviet states – Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia – signed the following year and the treaty entered into force in 1994. Five years later, six of the nine – all except Azerbaijan, Georgia and Uzbekistan – agreed to extend the treaty for another five years, and in 2002 these six agreed to create the collective security treaty organization as a military alliance. . . .