The Paris Agreement As A Human Rights Treaty

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the Human Rights Council (HRC) are working to highlight the links between climate change and human rights and to demand a rights-based approach to guide global climate change policy and action. The Human Rights Committee stresses the importance of addressing human rights in the context of discussions on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Ongoing negotiations on the Article 6 guidelines make it possible to integrate human rights protection measures, such as stakeholder consultations, environmental and social protection measures and an independent redress mechanism, into cooperative actions facilitated by mechanisms established by Article 6. The Gender Action Plan, the Facilitative Working Group of Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples` Platform and the Action for Climate Empowerment Agenda create additional spaces for stakeholder participation in the UNFCCC, which supports OHCHR. OHCHR will continue its work to ensure a rights-based approach in the implementation of the Paris Agreement, including through cooperation with the Conferences of the Parties to the UNFCCC (examples from the past below). The Special Rapporteur also noted that States must also take into account human rights standards in their climate change adaptation and response measures. The negotiations that culminated in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, the first universal legally binding agreement on climate change, which explicitly includes human rights, were concluded at COP21. The High Commissioner for Human Rights specifically called for the setting of a 1.5-degree target, a high level of ambition, supported by the results of several special DRR mechanisms in a 1.5-degree report requested by the Climate Advisory Forum and by the results of the scientific community in the fifth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The debate on human rights for higher ambitions, including the above-mentioned joint report on special procedures, resulted in the „ambitious coalition“, which resulted in the adoption of a 1.5-degree target, with a severe ceiling of 2.0 degrees. PARIS (3) December 2015) – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment, John Knox, today reminded all parties participating in the Paris Climate Change Conference* that „states` human rights obligations also encompass climate change“ and invited them to adopt a rights perspective in the management of environmental issues. „Every state in climate negotiations is at least a human rights treaty and must ensure that all its actions are consistent with its human rights obligations.

This includes their action on climate change,“ Mr. . .