Un Fish Stocks Agreement 1995

The Agreement was adopted on 4 August 1995 by the United Nations Conference on Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks and was opened for signature on 4 December 1995. It entered into force on 11 December 2001. In accordance with article 36 of the Agreement and in accordance with paragraph 16 of General Assembly resolution 59/25, the Secretary-General convened a review conference of the Agreement four years after its entry into force. Straddling stocks are fish stocks that pass through more than one exclusive economic zone or are in more than one exclusive economic zone. The agreement was adopted in 1995 and entered into force in 2001. [1] The Review Conference, which took place from 22 to 26 It was tasked with assessing the effectiveness of the Agreement in the conservation and management of straddling and highly migratory stocks, verifying and assessing the adequacy of its provisions and proposing, where appropriate, ways to strengthen the content and methods of implementation of these provisions in order to address the persistent problems of conservation and management of these stocks. The Agreement on Straddling Fish Stocks (the Agreement on the Implementation of the Provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 concerning the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks) is a multilateral treaty established by the United Nations to improve the cooperative management of fishery resources in large areas. and are of economic and environmental importance to a number of nations. As of December 2016, the treaty has been ratified by 91 parties, including 90 states and the European Union. [2] The great migrain fish is a term that has its origin in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

It concerns fish species that carry out ocean migrations and also have a wide geographical coverage, and generally refers to tuna and tuna species, shark, marlin and swordfish. Inter-territorial fish stocks are particularly vulnerable to overfishing due to inefficient management regimes and non-respect for fisheries interests. The Agreement provides for the application of the precautionary approach and ecosystem approaches for the conservation and management of straddling fish stocks and highly migratory fish stocks, as well as the compatibility of measures for the high seas and measures adopted for areas under national sovereignty. . . .